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* UK Medic to USA
 #858886  
  ukmedic - 07/23/19 07:57
 
  Hi guys

I'm just going into 2nd year of medical school here in the UK (It's a 5 year undergraduate program here). For personal reasons, I am determined to do residency in and permanently move to the US. I have spent this summer doing 3 months of research and got 2 publications (although I'm not the first author of either). Some of my work has also been shown at international conferences, by my supervisor.

I will have another 6 months of research (hopefully more) experience by the time Medical School finishes. Hopefully this will yield to further publications and the like.

In our final year, we have an 8 week "elective" which is a rotation we can do abroad. I plan to go to the US in this period to gain experience in the specialty of my choice.

Of course I know that I need to score as highly as possible in the USMLE exams.

I am willing to do a year of research in the US after I finish medical school, and would be extremely open to doing that, even just to gain a foothold in the US.

My questions are the following :
- Will I be at any advantage for completing Medical School in the UK, compared to graduates of Asian/African medical schools?
- Other than my 8 week elective, how can I gain clinical experience in the US?
- How difficult is it to do a "year in research" in the US post-medical school? This is something channels like IMG coaching have recommended
- My personal preference would be to be in California, Seattle or New York City. How is the difficulty in obtaining a residency in each of these locations respectively?

I am currently undecided in terms of my choice of residency. We start clinical rotations here in 3rd year. I am willing to go into any specialty to get to the US, although obviously I would prefer to be doing what I choose to do.
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383293
  futuremd313 - 07/24/19 14:08
 
  Hello ukmedic,

To answer your first question, you may have a slight advantage over graduates of Asian/African medical schools assuming your first language is English. Additinally, the UK system is more similar to the US system than Asian/African system so this may help you as well. As for gaining clinical experience in the US, you can gain clinical experience by doing rotations, whether it be observerships or externships, however externships/hands-on are somemites more preferred by some programs. The AMA website has a list of companies that sell these rotations that you can use as a tool. Lastly, the most IMG friendly state of the 3 would be New York City, as Seattle doesnít have a lot of programs to choose from. California has a lot of programs but since the demand to go there is so high, it makes it hard to find openings there for IMGs.

Hope this helps.
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383294
  ukmedic - 07/24/19 14:20
 
  @futuremd313

Thanks for your help
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383390
  kavya@4a1 - 07/27/19 15:21
 
  There wont be any advantage you will be considered as IMG itself. You can also gain externship rotation which is also considered as hands-on rotations which will strengthen your CV for the application.  
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383455
  santhosh - 07/30/19 13:12
 
  If you are a graduate then you can externship rotations in US for improving the CV, and you have still time for your graduation try to gain electives they are helpful for improving the CV.  
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383457
  adebayo212 - 07/30/19 13:31
 
  Haha... you donít have any advantage over graduates from Asia/Africa. You wish lol......
Your scores will set u apart. So donít be surprised even after itís all said and done, you donít get in and other Africans Img get in. Ask around, this is not the UK. So as long as u work hard, then u stand a good chance. Stop looking for upper edge based on nationality. Everybody is on a plane field
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383507
  ukmedic - 08/01/19 22:09
 
  @adebayo212

Ok, I was just asking because there are some countries (Australia, New Zealand) where a UK degree is an advantage.

I myself am Kenyan born in England. Best of luck in securing residency, and with your career.
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383554
  optimisticpositive - 08/04/19 16:39
 
  @ukmedic,
What is your email?
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3383573
  ukmedic - 08/06/19 03:33
 
  @optimisticpositive

ukmedictousa@googlemail.com
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3384437
  asklepaediausa - 09/18/19 13:52
 
  I was a family practice residency director who started a programme from scratch in 1996 in an inner city Chicago community hospital. When the programme went live on 1 July 1997, I had not only six PGY1 and six PGY2 residents but also one PGY3 resident who had the now defunct Scottish Triple Qualification (LRCPEdin LRCSEdin LRCP&SGlas) and MRCGP (Membership of the Royal Coleege of General Practitioners). His MRCGP enabled him to sit for the Amercian Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Certification Examination without any family medicine residency training in the US, owing to reciprocity in family practice training between the US and the UK at that time. However, he needed 12 months of US training to get a licence in one of the states to allow him to take the ABFM examination.

Within two months after he started his residency training at my new programme, he was granted full licences in both New York and Illinois, on account of his British degree (even though it was not from a regular British medical school) and his Full Registration with the UK General Medical Council. He was honourable enough to finish his twelve months' training with my programme even though he got what he wanted in less than two months (his US pre-requisite to take the ABFM examination).

In response to

kavya@4a1 - 07/27/19 15:21
There wont be any advantage you will be considered as IMG itself.

adebayo212 - 07/30/19 13:31
Haha... you donít have any advantage over graduates from Asia/Africa. You wish lol......

You have to be kidding. UK training is still one of the best in the world, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels; it is well recognised in the US. Yes, officially UK graduates are IMGs; but there are IMGs and there are IMGs. I actually talked to one of the members on the licensing board of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation and he confirmed to me that even though it was not on the Illinois law book, if someone got a British degree and the full registration with the General Medical Council, he/she was very likely to be granted full licensure in Illinois like a US graduate.

In response to
adebayo212 - 07/30/19 13:31
Your scores will set u apart. So donít be surprised even after itís all said and done, you donít get in and other Africans Img get in. Ask around, this is not the UK. So as long as u work hard, then u stand a good chance. Stop looking for upper edge based on nationality. Everybody is on a plane field

'This is not the UK', as though the US is more meritocratic and less xenophobic than the US. Having lived in both countries as a non-white person, I can tell you I did not notice much difference. As a former residency director who led a US family practice programme for almost 12 years, I can tell you nationality may not matter as much as the country that confers the degree, but both do matter in the US. That upper edige may not be sought by the candidate but is rather granted by the residency. I do not necessarily agree with it but it exists. Have you noticed all those Canadians who went to Irish medical schools and ended up being snatched up by US programmes above the non-Canadian IMGs who went to schools outside of the British Isles? I have even seen British graduates of South Asian heritage getting into surgical subspecialities that are usually off limits to non-US graduates.

UKMedic, my advice to you is not only to get your UK degree but also to complete that first of your two Foundation years so you can get the full UK registration before coming to the US. You will find your British credentials being much more sought after than most people would admit.
 
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* Re:UK Medic to USA
#3384503
  adebayo212 - 09/23/19 15:38
 
  Dude, stop lying to the guy about his credientials giving him an upper edge. As long as you don't study in the US, You are an IMG and they see you in the same way regardless of where u finish unless u got a strong credentials or you have a connection. Stop misleading people with your ignorance  
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